PERFIL

 

 
CITY SOCIO ECONOMIC PROFILE
 

Volume II Part I
POPULATION AND LAND USE

Chapter III
THE LOCAL ECONOMY


2..3.4
   Tourism Sub sector

Zamboanga City has been a traditional and established tourist destination in Southern   Philippines and Western Mindanao. It is likewise a well-known Philippine destination for cruise ships – especially in the ASEAN, BIMP-EAGA, and South China Sea circuits. Zamboanga City also acts as the gateway and service hub for the other Western Mindanao regional tourism destinations like Pagadian City, Dipolog City, and Dapitan City.

 

      2. 3.4.1    Classification and Nature of Tourist Attractions and Potentials

In accordance with the classification of the Department of Tourism (DOT), tourist attractions and potentials in Zamboanga City maybe categorized into four major classifications: natural; man-made; cultural-historical; and special interest attraction (Table III-42 Annex and Map III-2) shows the existing and potential tourist attraction in the city.

 

EXISTING & POTENTIAL TOURIST ATTRACTION MAP       

Natural Attractions

Natural attractions are assets which are part of the City’s physical structure such as lakes or rivers, seashores or coastal areas, waterfalls; islands; hills and mountains or valleys; forest or woods; interesting geological formations; and wild flower and wildlife. Natural attractions are either marine-based pr land-based.

 

Man-made Attractions

Man-made attractions include religious structures, old forts or barracks museums, battle sites, historic site or shrines; old houses, parks and recreational areas or resorts, etc. Like natural attractions, these may also be marine-based or land-based.

 

Cultural/Historical Attractions

These include those which cultural and historical significant, such as pioneer church sites, museum, historical sites or shrines city/state park, craftsman’s shop, etc.

 

Special Interest Attractions

These are generally city or community-sponsored activities designed to celebrate some special event, such as historical, religious, sports tournament, special shows, beauty contests, etc.

 

      2.3.4.2    Characteristic Features of tourism Resources

Natural Attractions

Santa Cruz Island

These islands are known for its pinkish sand beach because of the washed out corals from the sea bottom. On the island is a fishing village, lagoon and an old Moslem burial ground. These are an extensive and varied underwater life of coral heads and rocks, which support a large variety of tropical fish. The place is ideal for swimming, snorkeling, skin, and scuba diving, beachcombing and sunbathing. Sta. Cruz Island can be reached in 15 minutes by motorboats from either Lantaka Hotel or the Zamboanga Golf and Sports Complex.

The islands are located about 4 kilometers from the Poblacion Zones coastline. The islands hold great potential and are ideal for offshore, island - base resort developments. At, present, the islands are being utilized for tourism purposes, but have not reached their full potentials. Existing development plants and programs are very informal.

 

Bolong Beach and Eleven (11) Islands

This destination is about 30 kilometers from downtown Zamboanga City along the eastern coastal areas of the city. The 11 islands, starting with Visa island, the southernmost part of the cluster, is located off Brgy. Bolong while the northernmost part, Lampinigan Island, is 1.5 km. off the shores of Brgy Dita. These islands are scattered over a seven by six kilometer area, spanning four seaside Barangays, namely, Bolong, Panubigan, Lubigan, and Dita, going on a south-north direction. The area has been found to possess varied natural characteristics such as rock formation and off-white beaches fit for various recreational activities.

The island on the eastern side of the 11 island cluster, namely, Visa, Baong, Buguias, and Sirumon islands are gifted with white sand beaches on some portions of the islands edges, which can be ideal for swimming and sunbathing. Around these islands are deep

waters ranging from 16 to 24 fathoms that can be an ideal location for snorkeling , skin and scuba diving. These islands are also highly vegetated, attesting to the fertility of the soil. Some of the islets, particularly those adjacent to Visa and Baong Islands, can possibly be transformed into flower islets where various flower species of Zamboanga City can be cultivated and grown. Since they are very near the larger islands, they can be connected by hanging bridges.

The western side of the 11-island cluster, particularly Cabugan, Limbang, Bobo, and Simoandang, are generally rocks formations but still highly vegetated., except for Cabugan. Cabugan Island, with its relatively high rock information, can be developed for rock climbing rappelling activities with a hiking trail on the island. Some of its ledges can be developed as high as diving take-off points.

 

West Cast Site

The west coast sites identified as existing and potential tourism destinations are as follows: La Vista Del Mar, Zamboanga Golf Course, San Ramon Penal Colony, Sheik Mag Dum University, Yakan Weaving Village, San Ramon PCA Regional Experimental Station, and Coconut Plantations. The sites are at varying stages of planning and development and would be ideal foe a potential Zamboanga City West Coast Tourism Circuit. The sites are located from Barangay Calarian to Talisayan.

 

Bog Lake

The lake consist of about 60 to 70 has. of wetlands and is bounded on the east by a property owned by the Archdiocese of Zamboanga City where tall acacia trees are grown. This area is adjacent to a highly populated residential area linked to the Southern Command Compound. Another residential area, the Lakeview Subdivision, bounds the take on its west side.

The lake, which is about 4 km. from the city center, is adjacent to the northern half of the Zamboanga Golf and Country Club. Early settlers in Zamboanga remember it as a bird sanctuary during the cold season of neighboring countries. It could be considered as one of the largest bodies of water at the heart of a fast urbanizing area of the City, Calarian.

The Calarian State Freshwater Fisheries Sanctuary and Hatchery is also located at the heart of the lake. Clumps of coconut trees are clustered in the northern part of the lake, while towering old acacia trees can be found in the eastern part. Various types of freshwater fish and crocodiles are found in the lake. The perimeter of the lake area is highly vegetated, though most of them are wild grass and shrubberies.

The western and eastern sides of the lake are being overrun by residential development while the southern side bordering the Zamboanga Golf Course and Country Club is already being encroached by a considerable number of squatters.

 

East Coast Sites

The east coast site identified as existing and potential tourism destinations are as follows: Dacon Plantation, and other fruit and plant orchards, Fishing Villages, etc. the sites are at varying stages of planning and development and would be ideal for a potential Zamboanga City East Coast Tourism Circuit. The sites located from Barangays Taluksangay to Bolong.

 

Cruise Ship Destination Network

This destination is located in the existing Port Area of the Poblacion Zones. The area holds potential for assorted allied developments revolving on the presence of cruise ship berthing facilities and other related port activities.

Pasonanca Park Complex and Environs

Located about 7.5 kilometers from downtown Zamboanga City, Pasonanca today is known all over the Philippines as a tourist attraction. It has become a popular site for youth citizenship training and for boys and Girl Scout jamborees. To those who come from the north, perhaps due to its location at about 500 feet above sea level and surroundings of verdant hills and mountains. In a 1959 contest for parks, plazas and gardens nationwide., Pasonanca Park won the First Prize as the Number One Garden of the Philippines. Construction of this Park was began in 1912 by Gen. John J. Pershing, the military Governor for Mindanao.

Pasonanca Park is one of the centerpiece destinations of the city. Aside from the park proper, Pasonanca has a spectrum of other destinations within the park and its environs. Some of these are: Tree House, Pulung Bato – Chief Sarangan House; la Paz Resort, Climaco Freedom park; Bog Lake; Abong-Abong “Greenhouse” and View Decks; Zamboanga Convention and Multi-Purpose Center; and the Brgy. Sta. Maria Flower Showcase.

 

Tigbalabag Heights

Located in Bgy. Tigbalabag about 45 kilometers from downtown Zamboanga, the heights are suitable for upland, foothills and watershed-compatible developments. The area has commanding views and panoramic vistas of the city and the Moro Gulf.

 

Man-made Attractions

Taluksangay Village and Muslim Mosque

The village and mosque is located in Bgy. Taluksangay, in the eastern seacoast of the city, about 15 kilometers from downtown Zamboanga City. The village and Mosque are established tourism destinations of the city.

 

Rio Hondo Village

Rio Hondo Village is lovated in the heart of the city. The village is a typical Muslim Village on stilts and linked by catwalks and is built in the foreshore area.

 

Campo Muslim Sahaya

Campo Muslim Sahaya is another Muslim cultural showcase. It is located in Barangay Campo Islam, along the southwestern seacoast of the city.

 

Tulungatung Village

Tuungatung is another Muslim cultural showcase. It is located in Barangay Tulungatung, along the western areas of the city.

 

Yakan Weaving Village

The Yakans, the original inhabitants of Basilan Province, are considered one of the finest weavers of the Philippines. The Yakan weave is so fine that it takes a week or so to finish a meter of cloth. The Yakan clothe commands a high price in well-known trade centers in the Philippines because of its design and craftsmanship. It is located in Barangay Upper Calarian.

 

St. Ignatius de Loyola Church

Spanish Missionaries constructed St. Ignatius de Loyola, the oldest Church in Mindanao in 1863. it is located in Barangay Tetuan, near the Poblacion zones of the city.

 

Zamboanga Convention and Multi-Purpose Center

The golf course was originally known as the Zamboanga Golf and Country Club when Gen. John J. Pershing founded it in June 1910. This is one of the oldest golf courses in the country with Gen. Pershing the club’s finest president.

 

The course has 18 holes spread over 64 hectares and has a fine layout with winding fairways, dogleg situations and good greens planted to Tifton 228. Its bunkers have the unique pink sand from Sta. Cruz Island. Although the course’s first nine is somewhat flat in terrain, its second nine is fairly rolling and skirts the Basilan Strait for a magnificent ocean view. An interesting round is always in store for the average golfer or the proficient campaigner, as long tree mounds assure flexibility. This course has elevated greens, which can be tricky for, their small size and rolling make-up.

The Zamboanga Golf and Sports Complex is an established leisure and recreational facility of the City. It is located in barangay Upper Calarian. It is one of the only two golf courses in the City.

 

J.F. Enriquez Sports Complex

The J.F. Enriquez Sports Complex, located in Barangay San Jose Cawa-Cawa, is an established leisure and recreational destination. It is a regular venue of sporting events and tournaments.

 

Zamboanga City Public market and “Tiangges”

The Zamboanga City Public Markets and “Tiangges” located in the Zone 4 are well known and established shopping destinations of the city.

 

Zamboanga Barter Trade Market

Like the Public Market and “tiangges”, the Barter Trade Market located in the Barangay Canelar is also a “must-go-and-see” attraction of the City.

 

Ayala De Zamboanga Industrial Park

The 50-hectare ADZIP has been evaluated and been found most suitable for the establishment of an industrial park by the NEDA and the DTI Development started in 1994 and is expected to be completed in 1997. it is an industrial Estate and Mixed Use Development complete with plans and programs and with private sector initiatives.

 

Game Fowl Breeding/La Paz Mountain

The Game Fowl Breeding farm located in Bgy. La Paz is a regular destination of cockfighting aficionados. It is a private sector undertaking. Because of its cool temperature, the area is being eyed as a future “Little Baguio” of the City.

 

 

 

 

 

Fruit Orchards, Cut Flowers Plantations and Gardens

Located in the rural barangays along the eastern areas of the City, these Fruit Orchards, Cut Flowers Plantation and Gardens are potential tourism destinations and activity centers. It is a private sector initiative.

 

Barangay Sta. Maria Flower Showcase

The Barangay Sta. Maria Flower Showcase is envisioned to be a model barangay showcase. It is a cozy haven where neat and clean houses with flower gardens in front of each residence become a vision of a perfect retreat after a busy day at the office. It is reflective of Zamboanga City’s progress, social stability and appreciation of natural beauty.

 

Cultural/Historical Attractions

Zamboanga City Hall

Located in the heart of the City, the construction of this structure began in 1905 and was completed in 1907 by the Federal Government of the United States. It was fro the use of the American Military Governors of Mindanao like Leonard O. Wood, Tasker H. Bliss, Ralph W. Hoyt and John Pershing of the World War I fame. Today the structure serves as the City Hall of Zamboanga City.

 

Plaza Pershing

Located a mere two minutes walk from City Hall, the Plaza was originally known as “Plaza de Don Juan de Salcedo” in honor of ones of Spain’s great Conquistadores of the 16th century. It was renamed Plaza Pershing in 1915 in memory of General John J. “Blackjack” Pershing.

 

Pettit Barracks

The U.S. forces under Gen. C. Bates occupied a one-minute walk from City Hall, this structure after the capture of the city on November 16, 1899. The site was named Pettit Barracks in honor of Col. James S. Petit, (later promoted to general) of 31st infantry and the U.S. Volunteer Commanding Officer of the Second Military District. He later became the Inspector General and In-Charge of Civil Affairs of Zamboanga.

 

Fort Pilar

Located on N.S. Valderrosa St., a leisurely fifteen-minute walk from the City Hall, the Fort was built by Father Melchor de Vera, a Jesuit Priest-Engineer to ward off attacks of Muslims and foreign invaders. Originally named the “Real Fuerza de San Jose”, it was renamed “Real Fuerza del Nuestra del Pilar de Zaragoza” after it was rebuilt in 1719. The statue of the patroness was embossed on the East Wall in 1734 as a front piece atop the entrance, which was eventually sealed when it became a shrine.

It has a Museum and a Shrine of the Miraculous Lady of the Pillar. The City together with the National Museum and the National Historical Institute is presently restoring it

 

Palacio de Paz

The imposing and historic Palacio de Paz or “Palace for Peace” is formerly the seat of the Autonomous Government of Region IX. It now stands mute and empty, as the Autonomous Government has been transferred to Cotabato City.

.Cawa-Cawa Boulevard (R.T. Lim Boulevard)

The boulevard is a showcase of serenity and natural beauty. Here a visitor can see the colorful sunset across the emerald waters of the sea and the surrounding islands. The sunset beckons a visit to the islands. Located in Barangay San Jose Cawa-Cawa, it is an established leisure and recreational landmark of the city. It currently has a beautification and urban renewal program.

 

Special Interest Attraction

Special interest attractions include the:

 

            J.P. Mankin and Blanco Ancestral Homes

            Plaza Developments and Urban Plans

            Urban Renewal and Upgrade

            Special Events and Feastdays, Socio-Cultural-Religious Events

 

The Zamboanga city Profile in Figures (Office of the City Planning and Development Coordinator, 1997) lists the following data:

 

            Major Tourist Attractions

                        Beaches                                   9

                        Historical Landmarks                 6

                        Caves                                       7

                        Museums                                  2

                        Parks                                        2

 

Tourist Facilities

            Restaurants                               92        

            Hotels                                       14        

            Lodging                                    23

            Theatres                                   12

            Travel Agencies                        7

            Discos                                      8

            Bars and Night Clubs                 11

            Bowling Lanes                          2

 

Spatial Concentration of Tourist Attractions

Spatially, the tourist attractions may be classified as city center-based and watershed-based. These attractions are spread out over the east and west coasts, the latter being the area where the tourist attractions are more spatially concentrated.

 

Map III-3 shows the places of interest in the urban center.

 

2.3.4.3        Accommodations, Facilities and Services

 

Accommodations and Facilities

Based on the list in the Zamboanga City Profile, there are 23 hotels and lodgings accredited by the Department of Tourism (DOT) in the city as of September 1997 (Table III-43, Annex). There is only one hotel in Zamboanga City classified as a First Class. The rest are composed of one standard hotel, seven economy hotels, seven tourist inns, five pension houses, and two motels. Together, they provide 739 rooms for visitors. The Regional Tourism Framework for Region IX noted that Zamboanga City exhibited an aggregate of 27.4% occupancy rate in 1995.

 

Services

Some of the services available to tourist include tour operators, transport, department stores, and gasoline stations. There is one listed freelance tour guide.

 

2.3.4.4        Visitor Arrivals

For the past five years (1992-1996), data for visitor arrivals reveal a fluctuating trend – downtrend for the period 1992 to 1994 and an up trend for 1994 to 1996. The latter is reflective of the improvement in the Philippine economy and the heightened interest in Mindanao (Table III-44).

Table III-44.   Visitor Arrivals and Annual Growth Rates, Zamboanga City, 1992-1996

From

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

Domestic

64,057

57,362

48,170

55,559

67,254

            Total Domestic

64,057

57,362

48,170

55,559

67,254

Foreign

 

 

 

 

 

     Balikabayan

672

369

380

935

370

     ASEAN

778

1,201

858

876

1,218

     Australia

329

390

227

383

210

     Hong Kong

402

814

1,552

371

911

     Taiwan

605

472

295

233

220

     Japan

1,037

921

768

564

856

     North America

885

750

645

664

681

     Europe

1,437

1,293

1,098

970

1,018

     Others

2,191

1,891

616

637

811

             Total foreign

8,336

8,101

6,439

5,633

6,925

Yearly Totals

72,393

65,463

54,609

61,192

73,549

Total Annual Growth Rate

 

-9.57%

-16.58%

12.05%

20.19%

Source: Office of the City mayor, Zamboanga City

Over the period 1992 to 1996, domestic tourist to Zamboanga City constitutes about 88% to 91% of the total number of tourists. This trend indicates a large potential foreign market, which may be tapped with a more aggressive promotion strategy (Table III-45).

 

Table III-45.   Percent Share of Domestic, Balikbayan, and Foreign Arrivals, Zamboanga City, 1992-1996

Year

Domestic

%

Balikbayan

%

Foreign

%

Total

%

1992

64,057

88.48

672

0.93

7,664

10,59

72,393

100.00

1993

57,362

87.63

369

0.56

7,732

11.81

65,463

100.00

1994

48,170

88.21

380

0.70

6,059

11.09

54,609

100.00

1995

55,559

90.79

935

1.53

4,698

7.68

61,192

100.00

1996

67,254

91.44

370

0.50

5,925

8.06

73,549

100.00

                Source: Office of the City mayor, Zamboanga City

 

On a five-year average, the East Asians (Japan, Taiwan and Hong Kong) collectively constituted the largest group of foreign visitors to the city at 32.30% of the average total. Visitors from Japan and Hong Kong, who were almost in equal proportion, comprise the majority of this largest group.

 

URBAN TOURISM: PLACES OF INTEREST MAP         

The second largest group of visitors was composed of Europeans at 18.75% of the total, while visitors from ASEAN countries formed the third largest foreign visitor at 15.89% of the total. The Americans were the fourth largest group at almost 12%, while the balikbayans comprised 9% of the total.

Visitors from Hong Kong exhibited the highest annual growth rates among the foreign visitor groups. Their arrivals increased from 102% in 1993, dipping slightly to 91% in 1994 before plunging to – 76% in 1995. Their annual growth bounced back to a very high 146% in 1996.

Next to Hong Kong were visitors from Japan at 52% in 1996 from – 21.00 in 1995, followed by those from ASEAN countries rising from 2% in 1995 to 39% in 1996. Other countries have also increased on a relatively modest scale except for Australia. Arrivals from North America have remained relatively stable for the last two years.

Computing the average annual growth rates resulted in positive average annual growth rates in visitors from ASEAN, Australia, and Hong Kong and negative average growth rates in visitors from the rest of the countries of origin.

 

Table III-46.   Annual Growth Rates and percentage Share of Foreign Visitors, by Country of Origin, Zamboanga City, 1992-1996

Country of Origin

Annual Growth Rate (%)

5-Year Ave. No. Of Visitors

5-Year Ave. % Share

1993

1994

1995

1996

Average

ASEAN

54.00

-29.00

2.00

39.00

16.50

986

15.89

Australia

19.00

-42.00

69.00

-45.00

0.25

308

4.96

Hong Kong

102.00

91.00

-76.00

146.00

65.75

810

13.06

Taiwan

-22.00

-38.00

-21.00

-6.00

-21.75

365

5.88

Japan

-11.00

-17.00

-27.00

52.00

-0.75

829

13.36

North America

-15.00

-14.00

3.00

3.00

-5.75

725

11.69

Europe

-10.00

-15.00

-12.00

5.00

- 8.00

1,163

18.75

Others

-14.00

-67.00

3.00

27.00

-112.75

473

7.62

 

Compared with the visitor arrivals in Western Mindanao (Region IX), Zamboanga City accounts for about 37% of the regional total. It can be seen from the table that the percentage share of Zamboanga City for domestic visitor arrivals in the five-year period peaked at 45.11% in 1992, then declined to a low of 33.28 in 1994, and again climbed to 36.04% in 1996.

For the last two years, the growth rate foe domestic arrivals for Zamboanga City has dramatically increased from a low of – 16.02% in 1994 to 15.34% in 1995, and 21.05% in 1996. This echoes the dramatic increase in Region IX domestic visitor arrivals of 5.66% in 1994 which climbed to 7.72% in 1995, and increased drastically to 19.6% in 1996 (Table II-47).

The share of foreign/overseas visitors including Balikbayans to Zamboanga City, on the other hand, experienced some deep fluctuations from 1992 to 1994. From a 47.88% percentage share in 1992, it jumped to a high of 72.77% in 1993, declining to 21.36% in 1995, but increasing to 22.68% in 1996. The growth pattern of foreign visitor arrivals in Zamboanga City generally matched that of domestic visitors but the region as a whole experienced a great decline from 100.25% in 1994 to only 5.28% in 1996.

For the past two years (1995-1996), the aggregate number of visitor arrivals for both Zamboanga City and Region IX had an increasing trend, with the city hosting a five-year average of 37.5% of domestic arrivals and 38.7% of foreign/overseas arrivals.

 

Table III-47.   Comparative Distribution of Visitor Arrivals,

Zamboanga City and Region IX, 1992-1996

 

 

Area

1992

1993

1994

1995

1996

Domestic

      Zamboanga City (ZC)

64,057

57,362

48,170

55,559

67,254

      Region IX

142,000

153,456

144,763

155,934

186,618

         Share of ZC (%)

45.11

37.38

33.28

35.63

36.04

         Annual Growth Rate of ZC (%)

 

-10.45

-16.02

15.34

21.05

         Annual Growth Rate of Reg IX (%)

 

8.07

-5.66

7.72

21.05

Foreign/Overseas Visitors (including Balikbayans

       Zamboanga City (ZC)

8,336

8,101

6,439

5,633

6,295

       Region IX

17,410

11,132

22,292

26,369

27,761

         Share of ZC (%)

47.88

72.77

28.88

21.36

22.68

         Annual Growth Rate of ZC (%)

 

-2.82

-2.52

-12.52

11.75

         Annual Growth Rate of Reg IX (%)

 

-36.06

100.25

18.29

5.28

Total Visitors

      Zamboanga City (ZC)

72,393

65,463

54,6090

61,192

73,549

      Region IX

159,410

164,588

167,005

182,303

214,379

         Share of ZC (%)

45.41

39.77

32.69

33.57

34.31

         Annual Growth Rate of ZC (%)

 

-9.57

-16.58

12.05

20.19

         Annual Growth Rate of Reg IX (%)

 

3.25

1.50

9.13

17.60

            Sources of raw data: Region IX Facts and Figures, DOT, and Office of the City Mayor, Zamboanga City

 

 

Almost half of the domestic visitors of Region IX, 40% of whom arrived at Zamboanga City, were primarily there for commerce/business purpose, and only about 10% came for leisure and fun as their foremost concern.

 

Seventy seven percent of foreign/overseas visitors in Region IX arrive in Zamboanga City in 1993. In the same year, almost one-third of foreign/overseas visitors came to spend their holiday in the region and another quarter of them had business as their purpose (Table III-48).

 

 

Table III-48.   Purpose of Visit, By Visitor Type, Region IX, 1993

 

Purpose

% Of Domestic Visitors

% Of Foreign Visitors

Pleasure/Holiday

9.7

31.0

Commerce/Business

49.4

25.7

Visit Relatives and Friends

12.6

3.5

Convention/Conference

11.0

6.2

Others

17.3

33.7

             Source: Regional Tourism Framework for Region IX

 

 

The UP Asian Institute of Tourism (UPAIT) 1993 Survey in Region IX reported that the average daily expenditure of foreign visitors was P2, 817.00 (US$ 103.87) which is much lower than the average for all foreign visitors as reported by DOT in its 1995 survey, US$ 155.92. This is indicative of a lower cost of living in the region. The average tourist stayed from 3.5 to 4.5 days.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure III-24.   Visitor Arrivals, Zamboanga City, 1992-1996

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Figure III-25.   Annual Growth Rate (In Percent), Visitor Arrivals, Zamboanga city

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   2.3.5     Strength, Weaknesses, Opportunities & Threat Analysis

 

STRENGTHS

WEAKNESSES

OPPORTUNITIES

THREATS

Availability of about 22,000 hectares of irrigable land within seven watershed areas.

Conversion of irrigated and potentially irrigable lands to other uses, particularly to residential uses.

Vast marine resources for processing.

Continuous food (rice, poultry, and livestock, vegetables) importation from neighboring countries.

Availability of fishing grounds for both commercial and municipal fishing operations.

Illegal conversion of mangrove areas.

 

Availability of a large volume of seaweeds for processing.

Continuous encroachment of big vessels in the municipal waters.

Availability of areas for seaweed aquaculture.

Some irrigable areas require rehabilitation.

Provision of drying and other facilities to seaweed farmers.

Threat of lawless elements.

Availability of areas for seaweed production.

Lack of irrigation facilities in some of the farmlands.

Preservation of seven watershed areas to meet the demand for irrigation and domestic water.

Image problem due to Zamboanga City being the dateline of media reports.

Traditional and historical trading center.

Inadequacy of far-to-market roads in most of the barangays.

Expansion of agricultural lands in the East Coast area.

Proximity of hotbeds of insurgency.

 Existing air linkages with Labuan, Malaysia and Brunei Darrusalam and sea linkages with Sandakan, Malaysia

Low value added in livestock and poultry as products are sold in raw form.

Production of high value vegetables (i.e., sweet pea, sweet onion, cauliflower, cabbage).

Political uncertainty, i.e., integration with ARMM, interface with SPCPD.

Strategically located in BIMP-EAGA.

Inadequacy of stocks of cattle fatteners and breeders.

Intensification of corn production (i.e., contract growing) for feeds manufacturing.

Vulnerability of shorelines to attacks of some undesirable elements.

Recognized financial center in Western Mindanao.

Weak leadership or irrigators associations.

Market matching between agricultural producers and processors/market outlets.

Competition from Cebu City and Davao City.

Inter-connected with other major cities of the country. (Third largest number of fights next only to Manila and Cebu).

Poor performance of farmer’s cooperatives.

Research and development support for agricultural crops, livestock and poultry and fisheries.

 

 Modern telecommunication facilities (at par with international standard).

Occurrence of illegal fishing activities such as the use of hulbot-hulbot fishing gear, purse seiner, and super light with high wattage.

Provision on institutional support to existing farmers cooperatives and irrigators associations.

 

For forest resources.

Lack of strict enforcement of ordinances protecting municipal fishing grounds from encroachment of commercial fishing vessels.

Establishment of “bagsakan” center for agricultural products.

 

Gateway and service hub for other regional tourism destinations, i.e. Pagadian City, Dipolog City, Dapitan.

Low industrial productivity.

Production and processing of mango, coconut, and banana.

 

 Recognized domestic and International gateway.

Low investment generation.

Processing of meat, poultry and dairy products.

 

International cruise ship destination in BIMP-EAGA.

HEAN. Recognized international ship port-of-call.

High cost of shipping and transport.

Provision of alternative livelihood projects to fishing communities.

 

Gateway and service hub for other regional tourism destination, i.e., Pagadian City, Dipolog City, Dapitan.

Poor access of small and medium enterprises (SMEs) to support services, i.e., credit technology, and marketing

Large and diverse market in BIMP-EAGA.

 

Presence of support facilities such as the RAIC, ZAMBOECOZONE, and Sangali Fishing Port Complex.

Poor access of manufacturers/producers to modern and appropriate technology.

Production of “halal” chicken for BIMP-EAGA market.

 

 

 

 

 

STREGNTHS

WEAKNESSES

OPPORTUNITIES

THREATS

Wide spectrum of tourism assets.

Inefficient power distribution.

Production of cassava for processing (for the Brunei market).

 

Diverse culture.

Lack of strict enforcement of laws against illegal trading practices.

Identified roles in the BIMP-EAGA as international gateway for tourism and transshipment point.

 

 

Lack of coherent direction for tourism development.

Established cultural and trading links with Malaysia.

 

 

Lack of large-scale urban renewal and physical improvement efforts for the city.

Perceived improving peace and order in Southern Philippines and ARMM.

 

 

Lack of incentives for tourism development and investments that would encourage private sector investments

Zamboanga City as a domestic and ASEAN Regional Tourism Service Hub.

 

 

Deterioration and lack of maintenance of some tourist attractions, e.g., Pasonanca Park, city plazas.

Growing markets for nature and eco-tourism.

 

 

Lack of enforcement of city ordinances foe environmental sanitation.

High degree of name recall of Zamboanga City.

 

 

Low priority given to tourism by local officials.

 

 

 

Lack of skilled tourism manpower.

 

 

 

Poor drainage.

 

 

 

Lack of berthing facilities going to Sta. Cruz islands and 11 islands.

 

 

 

Encroachment of squatters in tourist areas, e.g., Pasonanca Park, proposed oceanarium.

 

 

 

Lack of historical markets and signage’s.

 

 

 

Lack of tourism collaterals.

 

 


1 Non-Pal includes lands under the former Kilusang Kabuhayan at kaunlaran (KKK) as well settlements.

2 Under the CA are private agricultural lands, which are less than 50 hectares, 24 to 50 hectares, and greater then 5-24 hectares.
 


 
 

 

 

 

Google
Search WWW Search zamboanga.net

WELCOME TO THE CITY OF ZAMBOANGA  PHILIPPINES CITY OF FLOWERS
www.zamboanga.com.ph   www.zamboanga.net